MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ


MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ I DE MEDICIS GALLERY I GALERIE DE MEDICIS

Between chaos and rebirth, her works are a reflection of our environment, and perhaps even a reflection of us as well.
Born in 1964, this visual artist represents through her heckled portraits, broken and glued back together, fragile, reconstituted from nothing, the passing of time and make us deal with emotions that bring two beings

together.
Through the series « the timeless »made with feathers, staples, and pins, Marie Ange tries to revive old photos by applying contemporar y technology and by magnifying what is at first a simple material.
With the feather portraits held by thin threads, the artist explores the fragility and the melancholy of the moment. The feelings and the characters that emerge are thus like the feathers that makes them up: suspended, frozen in a fall or a whirlwind, both eternal and motionless. Femininity is exacerbated by the lightness and the fragility of the medium.

BRUNO CATALANO I DE MEDICIS GALLERY

Sculture per un mondo in transito: I Voyageurs di Bruno Catalano

Li seguo da anni, dalle sponde di Marsiglia, fino all’aeroporto di Singapore, passando per le strade innevate di Courchevel. Sono i Voyageurs, i gruppi scultorei di Bruno Catalano, creature eteree , affascinanti nel misterioso rapporto tra vuoto e pieno, capaci di instaurare un dialogo con il mondo circostante, fino ad identificarsi con esso.

Sono migranti o nomadi, muniti di una valigia alla mano e di una speranza nel cuore alla ricerca di una vita migliore. Uomini per così dire “perforati” e forse ridotti a pezzi, come li ha resi metaforicamente l’ambiente circostante.
Con uno sguardo introspettivo procedono con passo incerto verso una realtà sconosciuta.

BRUNO CATALANO

"Une valise, un homme. Il s'en empare, et se lance vers l'inconnu. Voyage volontaire vers un horizon qu'on embrasse et qu'on voudrait infini, ou voyage forcé, contraint par l'exil et la souffrance, en quête de liberté et guidé par la survie.

Le voyageur de Bruno Catalano est cet homme laissé à lui même, un homme propulsé dans l'infini du temps et de l'espace. Sa maison n'est plus qu'une valise et son être, progressivement, se dépouillera de tout ce qu'il croyait indispensable, de tout son moi si savamment construit par nos sociétés. Il n'est plus l'homme d'un monde, mais l'homme dans le monde, encore empreint de sa culture mais devenu fragile face à l'immensité. Sa quête ne se fera pas sans dommages.

Homme défragmenté, déstabilisé, dépouillé de ses repères, il marche vers son salut autant que vers sa perte. Tout sera désormais a réinventer. Ce voyageur s'échappe de lui même, à la rencontre de sa terre inconnue."

- Anne Maitre

BRUNO CATALANO DE MEDICIS GALLERY PARIS PLACE DES VOSGES

JESUS CURIA PEREZ

L’artiste espagnol travaille depuis plus de 25 ans la sculpture, où il nous invite à nous glisser dans un monde onirique. Le travail de Jesus Curia nous transmet une sensation de paisibilité, de profondeur et d’un équilibre certain. Un univers parallèle apparait devant nous, où des personnages hybride, avec une morphologie humaine à laquelle vient s’ajouter fréquemment des lignes droites et des formes géométriques. Sa sensibilité à l’espace et le monde qui nous entoure, lui permet de façonner ces œuvres d’une manière harmonieuse, en créant très souvent le sentiment de suspension des personnages dans le vide.

Les colonnes de Jesus Curia se caractérisent par le contraste qui se crée à partir de la pesanteur du bronze et la représentation de légèreté des sujets.

Nous retrouvons ainsi des enfants suspendus dans l’espace par un fil invisible, ou par une main bienveillante les empêchant de tomber. Plongés dans le jeu et l’amusement, ces enfants forment une colonne montante vers le ciel, avec une gravité inexistante. La douceur et la poésie sont au rendez-vous avec une œuvre qui nous invite à un voyage lointain dans des terres inexplorées.

Chaque colonne est unique, l’interaction et la position des personnages étant organisée de façon différente à chaque fois par les soins de l’artiste. La patine, qui varie également, vient sublimer ces êtres naïfs en constant équilibre.

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here

JONTY HURWITZ

JONTY HURWITZ CREATES WORLD'S SMALLEST SCULPTURE ONLY FOR IT TO BE ACCIDENTALLY CRUSHED AS IT WAS BEING PHOTOGRAPHED

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

An artist has created the world's smallest sculpture only for it to be accidentally crushed by a finger while being photographed. 

Jonty Hurwitz's creations are so tiny they can rest on a human hair and are the same size of an ant's head. Having spent months working on the pieces, the 45-year-old from Chichester, West Sussex, took them to a photographer to have them pictured under a microscope. But within minutes his work had been destroyed by the stroke of the lab technician's finger. 

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

I went off to have the original sculptures photographed so I found a laboratory with an electron microscope and the photographic technology,' said Mr Hurwitz. 

'The technician went to change the orientation and then for the next half an hour we were looking for the piece through the lens. Eventually I noticed there was a fingerprint exactly where the sculpture used to be and I was like "man you have just destroyed the smallest art pieces" ever made - I slightly freaked out.' 

The sculptures are less than 1mm tall and are produced via a process called nano-painting. They are too small to be seen with the naked eye so must be viewed and photographed under a microscope. Mr Hurwitz uses a 3D printing technology to produce them. 

Describing the process on his website, he said: 'The structure is created using a ground-breaking new 3D printing technology and a technique called Multiphoton Lithography. 

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

Mr Hurwitz has produced a number of nano sculptures using the same technology though the naked woman above is believed to have been the smallest.

'Ultimately these works are created using the physical phenomenon of two photon absorption. Art, literally created with Quantum Physics. This two photon absorption occurs only at the tiny focal point - basically a tiny 3D pixel (called a Voxel). 

'The sculpture is then moved along fractionally by a computer controlled process and the next pixel is created. Slowly, over hours and hours the entire sculpture is assembled pixel by pixel and layer by layer.'

You can find the full article of the Daily Mail here

Craig Alan

CRAIG ALAN'S FAMOUS FACES IN A CROWD OR HOW INTRICATE ARTWORKS SEE BIG SCREEN STARS RECREATED IN PAINTINGS OF DOZENS OF TINY FIGURES

Craig Alan / De Medicis Gallery

Small people, big star: This portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Atlanta-based artist Craig Alan may look like an aerial photo, but is actually created with dozens of tiny painted figures.

Combining technical skill, creativity and wit, Craig portrays iconic faces, buildings and abstracts through dozens, sometimes hundreds of intricately painted, exquisite figures. Each distinctive piece is created in black and white with a touch of red on some of the more glamorous faces. In their own way, they reflect Craig’s highly recognisable take on life, where it is the small details that work together to create the big picture. 

Craig carefully plans and creates each tiny figure, all which have their own identity and personality which he has thought through to the finest details. In some of his extremely rare originals, he even goes as far as detailing each item of clothing on the individuals. His cast of characters include family members, friends and models, giving his work a uniquely personal touch. Each piece contains a range of 400 to 1,800 people in it depending on the type of work it is, and he spends anywhere from 50 to 150 working hours on one painting.

Now based in Atlanta, Craig was born in California, but his artistic talent began to emerge when his family moved south. His earliest experimentation took the form of street portraiture, an endeavour that helped him perfect his flair for replicating the human figure. He has exhibited his work across the United States and Europe at De Medicis Gallery Paris to great acclaim and is now making a significant impact on the UK market. He has a work of art hanging in the White House in Senator Reed’s office and his art was shown in Scope Miami 2014 “We are all part of something greater than ourselves, and if we work together we could achieve greater balance . . . not in a religious sense but rather a universal sense.”

The full article can be found on the The Daily Mail website here