RENAUD DELORME | DE MEDICIS GALLERY

🖍Born in Marseille in 1970, Renaud Delorme belongs to an emerging group of innovative artists working in France. The path of his artistic career might have been ordained at birth – he is a descendant of Adolphe Monticelli, one of the pioneers of French impressionism. After studying Plastic Arts at the renowned University Paris VIII, Delorme began exhibiting his work in individual and group shows in cities such as Paris, Antwerp and San Francisco. His exciting work has won several awards and can be found in numerous international collections.

What might appear to be an optical illusion at first glance turns out to be an intricate mosaic of shapes and colours upon closer inspection. Renaud Delorme works at the intersection of pop art, recycling art, and computer graphics – a stylistic synthesis that could not be more unconventional. Whether using tennis balls to artfully recreate the wavy hairstyles of film icons such as Marilyn Monroe and Brigitte Bardot or shaping Nastassja Kinski’s delicate face out of computer chips and keyboard fragments, Delorme’s Well Organized Muses stay true to their name. In an era of digital art, the French artist empowers everyday items and experiments with new forms of expression that strive to reach a balance between image and object.

🖍 Né en 1970 à Marseille, Renaud Delorme appartient à un collectif d’artistes français à la fois ambitieux et innovant. Il se pourrait que sa fibre artistique lui ait été transmise héréditairement, puisque son ancêtre maternel, Adolphe Monticelli, fut un précurseur de l’impressionnisme français. Après des études d’arts plastiques à la célèbre université Paris VIII Vincennes-Saint Denis, les premières expositions individuelles et collectives de Delorme s’ensuivent rapidement, à Paris, Anvers et San Francisco notamment. À l’heure actuelle, son œuvre très prometteuse est représentée dans de nombreuses collections internationales et lui a valu plusieurs prix.

Ce qui à première vue semble être une illusion d’optique, s’avère être en fait, en y regardant de plus près, une mosaïque sophistiquée de formes et de couleurs. Renaud Delorme travaille à la croisée du Pop art, du recyclage et du graphisme numérique – une synthèse de styles des plus originales. La série Well Organized Muses porte bien son nom : Delorme s’inspire avec habileté des sublimes chevelures de Marilyn Monroe et de Brigitte Bardot pour les reproduire ensuite avec des balles de tennis, ou recrée le fin visage de Nastassja Kinski à partir de puces informatiques et de fragments de claviers d’ordinateur. À l’ère du numérique, cet artiste français se tourne de préférence vers les objets. Il explore les nouveaux moyens d’expression artistique visant à traiter sur un pied d’égalité image et matière.


Juan Miguel Palacios : Entre rêves et réalité

A l’âge de 6 ans, Juan Miguel est un garçon très hyperactif. Sa mère ne trouve pas de moyen de le canaliser, et décide de l’inscrire dans un cours de peinture en lui faisant croire qu’il s’agit d’un cours de karaté. Bien que déçu par le mensonge de sa mère, Juan Miguel Palacios est impressionné par les toiles, chevalets et accessoires de peinture présents dans la salle d’art et c’est à partir de ce moment-là qu’il trouve sa vocation.

Juan Miguel Palacios a effectué ensuite ses études à l’école d’arts décoratifs de Madrid « Amadeo Roca Gisbert » où il a travaillé pendant six ans. Cette période va fortement inspirer Juan Miguel Palacios dans chacune de ses créations.

Pour l’artiste, les murs cassés sont utilisés comme surface, sur laquelle la peinture vient fusionner afin de donner des œuvres d’une puissance inouïe. Juan Miguel Palacios aborde les concepts de deuil, d’agitation et d’inégalité, ce qui lui permet d’explorer en profondeur les émotions propres à l’être humain.

De Medicis Gallery a l’honneur d’exposer ses œuvres d’art au 18 Place des Vosges 

JMPalacios-wounds.-CXXI.jpg
Juan Miguel Palacios.jpg

STIKKI PEACHES

Stikki Peaches’ is an anonymous street artist who is strongly influenced by pop culture references and street culture. From his beginnings in 2009, his “What If Art Ruled The World?” tagline had every passer-by engaged in thought, while enjoying the uniqueness of his nostalgia-laced street art.

Having had his first international solo show in 2013 in New York and having participated in the Scope Art Show NYC, Art Basel Miami and Urvanity Art Fair in Madrid, Spain, Stikki Peaches now looks forward to his first Euro exhibitions in late 2017 and 2018. His work as also been seen in the urban areas of Paris, New York, Toronto, Los Angeles, Berlin, Stockholm and London.


Frida Kahlo de Rivera , 122 × 122 cm, 2018

Frida Kahlo de Rivera, 122 × 122 cm, 2018

MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ


MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ I DE MEDICIS GALLERY I GALERIE DE MEDICIS

Between chaos and rebirth, her works are a reflection of our environment, and perhaps even a reflection of us as well.
Born in 1964, this visual artist represents through her heckled portraits, broken and glued back together, fragile, reconstituted from nothing, the passing of time and make us deal with emotions that bring two beings

together.
Through the series « the timeless »made with feathers, staples, and pins, Marie Ange tries to revive old photos by applying contemporar y technology and by magnifying what is at first a simple material.
With the feather portraits held by thin threads, the artist explores the fragility and the melancholy of the moment. The feelings and the characters that emerge are thus like the feathers that makes them up: suspended, frozen in a fall or a whirlwind, both eternal and motionless. Femininity is exacerbated by the lightness and the fragility of the medium.

ISABELLE SCHELTENS

DISTANCE CREATES BEAUTY 

ISABEL SCHLETJENS DE MEDICIS GALLERY .png

Isabelle Scheltjens has put an original and contemporary touch on classical pointillism. She developed a new way of portrait making, whereby thousands of pieces of glass in specific patterns optically form an image. Pointillists used small, distinct dots of pure colour on their canvases, placed in close proximity so that they would blur into new colours. Isabelle applies a similar technique, using layers of coloured glass instead of paint. She immersed herself in the understanding of colour and creates her portraits with maniacal intensity – featuring intricate detail, lighting and shadows.

PREFAB77

Prefab77 used to be a collective working out of Newcastle, and now one artist, Peter Manning represents the title. Number 77 in Prefab77 refers to the year of 1977, which was a very successful year for British celebrities in the arts field. They made a great impact on the British street art scene. Their work included giant paste ups that are almost as big as a three-storey building. Their works are an interesting blend of rock, punk with an ethnic African headgear, and other imagery with women in the center. Manning creates artwork that often has political and sometimes anti-establishment tone, but these images are beautiful and reveal a lot from the modern culture. His work is a dark world of money, fashion, music, and politics woven into a luxurious mixture of acrylic, spray paint, wheat paste, and varnish.

Manning started his career as a printmaker and designer for the Queen in the British Army. He worked as a designer for well-known fashion brands. His work was commissioned by brands like Converse, Gap, Hurley, NIKE, Keds, and Ride Snowboards. In 2011, he created the cover art for Dancing Backward in High Heels, which was the fifth and final studio album by American rock band New York Dolls from the 1970s.

PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS  Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.  70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5       

PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS

Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.

70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5 

 

 

BRUNO CATALANO I DE MEDICIS GALLERY

Sculture per un mondo in transito: I Voyageurs di Bruno Catalano

Li seguo da anni, dalle sponde di Marsiglia, fino all’aeroporto di Singapore, passando per le strade innevate di Courchevel. Sono i Voyageurs, i gruppi scultorei di Bruno Catalano, creature eteree , affascinanti nel misterioso rapporto tra vuoto e pieno, capaci di instaurare un dialogo con il mondo circostante, fino ad identificarsi con esso.

Sono migranti o nomadi, muniti di una valigia alla mano e di una speranza nel cuore alla ricerca di una vita migliore. Uomini per così dire “perforati” e forse ridotti a pezzi, come li ha resi metaforicamente l’ambiente circostante.
Con uno sguardo introspettivo procedono con passo incerto verso una realtà sconosciuta.

KURAR

Kurar, tombe dans le graffiti dès la fin des années 90. Pendant 10 ans il va peindre, travaillant sur la 3D, le volume, et la couleur.. Au fil du temps et des expériences il va diversifier ses techniques, Graff, Vandale, Pochoir, Collage, pour ce concentrer sur le travail des pochoirs.

Au travers du pochoir et de son travail sur toiles, ce street artist traite des sujets actuels et nous pousse à prendre du recul sur notre vision de la société. Mélangeant univers ancien, et détails contemporain dans ces œuvres Kurar traite avec poésie, humour et provocation, des sujets sensibles comme la guerre, la religion, et la société de consommation.

L’utilisation et la représentation de l’enfance, est un des points récurent et une certaine « marque de fabrique » de Kurar. Il utilise brillamment ce symbole de l’innocence pour contraster avec l’aspect satirique et provocatrice de ces représentations.

Depuis une ascension en 2013, marqué par une exposition personnelle à la galerie Parisienne Onega, le street artist enchaine les expositions personnel et expose dans les galeries du monde entier, New york, Los Angeles, Genève, Dusseldorf, La Reunion, Bruxelles, Berlin, etc..

Entre cynisme et péosie, nostalgie et humour noir, il touche le public par la profondeur et la pertinence de ses messages.

Socilal Distortion I Acrylique on canvas I 130 x 89 cm 

Socilal Distortion I Acrylique on canvas I 130 x 89 cm 

JUAN MIGUEL PALACIOS

Juan Miguel Palacios' journey started at the School of Decorative Arts of Madrid which gained him the opportunity to join the studio of renowned Spanish artist Amadeo Roca Gisbert for six years. These years were cruicial for Palacios' artistic flair and this training is visible in every artwork he creates.

Concepts such as mourning, restlessness and inequality are vital in Palacios' work as they allow him to explore a range of human emotions. His powerful and modern techniques involve almost abstract brushtrokes and a strong use of colour to create a feeling of decay and abandonment.

Driven by his search for new forms of expression, Juan Miguel Palacios created series such as Wounded, where the artist has used broken walls as the surface for his works. This technique has created an extra dimension in his work which he allows the viewer to dissect. His works blend reality with dreamlike worlds, with his subjects seeming to escape their two-dimensional invisible cages and become tangible parts of reality.

Canvas, vinyl, meth-acrylate, aluminium and drywall surfaces are where Juan Miguel Palacios presents his work.

Title : Wounds LXXI  106 x 122 x 10 cm  Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

Title : Wounds LXXI
106 x 122 x 10 cm
Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

BRUNO CATALANO

"Une valise, un homme. Il s'en empare, et se lance vers l'inconnu. Voyage volontaire vers un horizon qu'on embrasse et qu'on voudrait infini, ou voyage forcé, contraint par l'exil et la souffrance, en quête de liberté et guidé par la survie.

Le voyageur de Bruno Catalano est cet homme laissé à lui même, un homme propulsé dans l'infini du temps et de l'espace. Sa maison n'est plus qu'une valise et son être, progressivement, se dépouillera de tout ce qu'il croyait indispensable, de tout son moi si savamment construit par nos sociétés. Il n'est plus l'homme d'un monde, mais l'homme dans le monde, encore empreint de sa culture mais devenu fragile face à l'immensité. Sa quête ne se fera pas sans dommages.

Homme défragmenté, déstabilisé, dépouillé de ses repères, il marche vers son salut autant que vers sa perte. Tout sera désormais a réinventer. Ce voyageur s'échappe de lui même, à la rencontre de sa terre inconnue."

- Anne Maitre

BRUNO CATALANO DE MEDICIS GALLERY PARIS PLACE DES VOSGES

JESUS CURIA PEREZ

L’artiste espagnol travaille depuis plus de 25 ans la sculpture, où il nous invite à nous glisser dans un monde onirique. Le travail de Jesus Curia nous transmet une sensation de paisibilité, de profondeur et d’un équilibre certain. Un univers parallèle apparait devant nous, où des personnages hybride, avec une morphologie humaine à laquelle vient s’ajouter fréquemment des lignes droites et des formes géométriques. Sa sensibilité à l’espace et le monde qui nous entoure, lui permet de façonner ces œuvres d’une manière harmonieuse, en créant très souvent le sentiment de suspension des personnages dans le vide.

Les colonnes de Jesus Curia se caractérisent par le contraste qui se crée à partir de la pesanteur du bronze et la représentation de légèreté des sujets.

Nous retrouvons ainsi des enfants suspendus dans l’espace par un fil invisible, ou par une main bienveillante les empêchant de tomber. Plongés dans le jeu et l’amusement, ces enfants forment une colonne montante vers le ciel, avec une gravité inexistante. La douceur et la poésie sont au rendez-vous avec une œuvre qui nous invite à un voyage lointain dans des terres inexplorées.

Chaque colonne est unique, l’interaction et la position des personnages étant organisée de façon différente à chaque fois par les soins de l’artiste. La patine, qui varie également, vient sublimer ces êtres naïfs en constant équilibre.

DAVID GERSTEIN

ISRAELI ARTIST DISPLAYS CUT-OUT SCULPTURES

David Gerstein / DeMedicis Gallery

Art by Israeli artist David Gerstein 

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Israeli artist David Gerstein, 73, loves observing small animals, especially butterflies whose beautiful colors and dancing amaze him. He also likes watching crowds of people that make him feel the energies of city life. Although he is not good at sports, he is fascinated with the grace which athletes demonstrate.

He transforms his affection for these things into cut-out sculptures, with series called Butterfly, Sports, Beach and Urban.

The series are now on show at Beijing's Today Art Museum, as part of his China debut exhibition titled Layers, through May 16. His paintings are also on display.

Early in his career, Gerstein was into painting, but gradually focused on sculpture in the 1980s, which he sees as adding a third dimension to his paintings.

For his cut-out sculptures, he cuts out shapes from metal plates, paints on them and layers them.

Describing his show, he says, "The exhibition (in Beijing) is (for me) the most important one in a decade. But it is not a retrospective. That time hasn't yet arrived."

You can find the full article here 

JONTY HURWITZ

“OBLIQUE” AND “CATOPTRIC”: ANAMORPHIC ARTWORKS BY JONTY HURWITZ

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

The painting The Ambassadors (1533) by Bavaria-born artist Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497–1543) occupies a special place in the history of Western art. It features Jean de Dinteville (French Ambassador to the court of Henry VIII of England) and Georges de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur (in southern France). Important elements include an Azerbaijanian rug and mathematical instruments like dials and quadrants. The artwork remains most famous, however, for a strange momento mori in the foreground, at the bottom – a human skull – tilted, contracted, stretched. Visible in its correct form only when seen from an oblique point of view. This is an example of “anamorphosis” – a distorted projection of an object that is set right when regarded from a specific perspective or when reflected on another surface.

 

The Ambassadors (1533) by Hans Holbien, Wikimedia Commons

the skull in The Ambassadors.jpg

The skull in The Ambassadors, Wikipedia

It is believed that the practice goes back to Leonardo da Vinci. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan has a large collection of the Renaissance polymath’s notes. There, on folio 35 of the Codex Atlanticus, are two strangely elongated sketches of a child’s head and an eye. These distorted and hesitant drawings, the first known anamorphoses (c.1485) – along with Holbein’s painting – are the seeds of inspiration for Jonty Hurwitz (born 1969) – a London-based South African artist, engineer and entrepreneur, known for his scientifically inspired works. “Leonardo pushed the boundaries of his time by exploring how the observer’s perception is implicitly linked to the observation,” says Jonty. “My art uses Leonardo’s theories as a starting point.”

A member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, Jonty creates sculptures of both “Oblique Anamorphosis” and “Catoptric Anamorphosis”. The first requires a new angle of vision and the second, a reflecting surface like a steel cylinder. Jonty is also into nano technology and holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s smallest animal form – “Fragile Giant” (2015), a life-like sculpture of an elephant measuring 0.157mm in height.

Jonty HURWITZ     |    The hand that caught me falling     | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

Jonty HURWITZ | The hand that caught me falling | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

David Gerstein

POP ART FOR THE PEOPLE: DAVID GERSTEIN’S HAPPY PALETTE

David Gerstein / De Medicis Gallery

Museums and galleries tend to abide by the “no touch” rule to safeguard the artworks they display. But Israeli contemporary artist David Gerstein encourages a hands-on approach, firmly believing that his creations are for the public and not for private collectors or curators.

“My philosophy is that art should touch life. It shouldn’t be something that you see once a year when you go to a museum,” Gerstein tells ISRAEL21c at his studio in the Bet Shemesh Industrial Zone.

There’s a pop-art feel to the everyday items he depicts in his multilayered wall sculptures, outdoor sculptures, paintings, prints, drawings and designed objects.

David Gerstein’s “Fifth Avenue” wall sculpture

“It’s my personal pop art. I’m not following Andy Warhol but I’m using the same feeling about the colors, about the popular images,” he explains. “It’s about speaking with the audience at eye level. My work is not a riddle. Many times I go to museums and see artworks that are vague. I want people to understand what I mean.”

The subject matter for his paintings and sculptures all comes from scenes in his past. “My memory of my mother riding a bike became the Tour de France wall sculpture,” he explains. “I’m not just inventing images. They’re all based on my memories.”

Gerstein has succeeded in bringing his universal language of playfulness, humor and optimism to the public-at-large in many countries.

“Peloton Wave,” done in 2014, is installed outside an athletic stadium inSinchu, South Korea. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

His most famous work, an 18.35-meter-high painted steel outdoor sculpture called “Momentum,” is installed in Singapore’s central business district. “It became an icon,” he says.

“Momentum” in Singapore. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

“My best works are outdoors because it’s in the public domain. I like people to experience it when they’re walking, driving, being part of the public. That gives me the most pleasure,” he says. “It talks with the environment, with the surrounding architecture. It’s my great experience, doing public works.”

Which of his works is his favorite? “My most favorite is the one I’m going to do,” Gerstein replies.“My mind is always thinking about the next creation.”

You can find the full article on the ISRAEL21c's website here

CRAIG ALAN

PEOPLE AS PIXELS PRODUCE PORTRAITS OF PEOPLE

Craig Alan / DeMedicis Gallery

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

American artist Craig Alan creates portraits of Marilyn Monroe, John F. Kennedy the Statue of Liberty and even Audrey Hepburn from Breakfast At Tiffany’s and Paris Hilton, like you’ve never seen them before. That’s because he uses people as pixels.

Of course, he’s not the only one who uses humans as visual pins to generate a mosaic. It happens in North Korea all the time (see image of the Mass Games in Pyongyang – a propaganda-filled synchronized performance done by 100,000 people by photographer Sam Gellman). But there is something about Alan’s work that combines the ability to see close up, and the big picture that feels more artistic and substantive.

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

You can find the full article on the Five Thôt website here

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here

Nerone

LE MUR DE BORDEAUX BY NERONE   

Nerone / De Medicis Gallery

1ère semaine de froid hivernal en ce début d’année 2016, et pourtant le printemps est déjà de retour sur le mur de Bordeaux avec Nerone.

Depuis le 15 Janvier, les fleurs ont envahi la place Jean & Jean Paul Avisseau.
Sur un fond tracé un peu comme un négatif de photo, Nerone a peint chaque pétale avec des couleurs vives pour finir sur un éclatant bouquet de fleurs exotiques.
Juste à côté des 2 flamboyants loups de Spaik, le lieu rayonne littéralement et semble donner du peps à l’ensemble du quartier.

Originaire de la région bordelaise et membre du collectif CoktailNerone a notamment réalisé avec son acolyte Epis un magnifique mur en partenariat avec la mairie de Bégles, dans la banlieue bordelaise, sur la façade du batiment abritant le service Jeune de la ville.
Surnommé Dandy Birds, l’oeuvre représente 2 pies au look baroque, guidées par ce qui semble être une diane chasseresse et un dandy anglais.
Impossible de passer à côté si l’on se balade dans ce quartier..

Egalement présent à la derniere saison de Transfert avec son collectif, Coktail avait choisi le thème de la fête foraine pour investir une partie de l’ancien commissariat Casteja avec une mise en scène ultra vitaminée.

Retouvez l'article ici

Nerone

STREET ART BY FRENCH ARTIST NERONE

Nerone / De Medicis Gallery

Nerone was inspired by Hip Hop and graffiti culture from age eleven. He spent years fine turning his writing skills before diving into street art. A journey which has taken him around Europe including Shoreditch in East London. The rich colour palette breathes life into any surface Nerone chooses to paint. 

Source : http://londonstreetartdesign.co.uk/street-art-by-french-artist-nerone/