DAVID GERSTEIN

ISRAELI ARTIST DISPLAYS CUT-OUT SCULPTURES

David Gerstein / DeMedicis Gallery

Art by Israeli artist David Gerstein 

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Israeli artist David Gerstein, 73, loves observing small animals, especially butterflies whose beautiful colors and dancing amaze him. He also likes watching crowds of people that make him feel the energies of city life. Although he is not good at sports, he is fascinated with the grace which athletes demonstrate.

He transforms his affection for these things into cut-out sculptures, with series called Butterfly, Sports, Beach and Urban.

The series are now on show at Beijing's Today Art Museum, as part of his China debut exhibition titled Layers, through May 16. His paintings are also on display.

Early in his career, Gerstein was into painting, but gradually focused on sculpture in the 1980s, which he sees as adding a third dimension to his paintings.

For his cut-out sculptures, he cuts out shapes from metal plates, paints on them and layers them.

Describing his show, he says, "The exhibition (in Beijing) is (for me) the most important one in a decade. But it is not a retrospective. That time hasn't yet arrived."

You can find the full article here 

David Gerstein

POP ART FOR THE PEOPLE: DAVID GERSTEIN’S HAPPY PALETTE

David Gerstein / De Medicis Gallery

Museums and galleries tend to abide by the “no touch” rule to safeguard the artworks they display. But Israeli contemporary artist David Gerstein encourages a hands-on approach, firmly believing that his creations are for the public and not for private collectors or curators.

“My philosophy is that art should touch life. It shouldn’t be something that you see once a year when you go to a museum,” Gerstein tells ISRAEL21c at his studio in the Bet Shemesh Industrial Zone.

There’s a pop-art feel to the everyday items he depicts in his multilayered wall sculptures, outdoor sculptures, paintings, prints, drawings and designed objects.

David Gerstein’s “Fifth Avenue” wall sculpture

“It’s my personal pop art. I’m not following Andy Warhol but I’m using the same feeling about the colors, about the popular images,” he explains. “It’s about speaking with the audience at eye level. My work is not a riddle. Many times I go to museums and see artworks that are vague. I want people to understand what I mean.”

The subject matter for his paintings and sculptures all comes from scenes in his past. “My memory of my mother riding a bike became the Tour de France wall sculpture,” he explains. “I’m not just inventing images. They’re all based on my memories.”

Gerstein has succeeded in bringing his universal language of playfulness, humor and optimism to the public-at-large in many countries.

“Peloton Wave,” done in 2014, is installed outside an athletic stadium inSinchu, South Korea. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

His most famous work, an 18.35-meter-high painted steel outdoor sculpture called “Momentum,” is installed in Singapore’s central business district. “It became an icon,” he says.

“Momentum” in Singapore. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

“My best works are outdoors because it’s in the public domain. I like people to experience it when they’re walking, driving, being part of the public. That gives me the most pleasure,” he says. “It talks with the environment, with the surrounding architecture. It’s my great experience, doing public works.”

Which of his works is his favorite? “My most favorite is the one I’m going to do,” Gerstein replies.“My mind is always thinking about the next creation.”

You can find the full article on the ISRAEL21c's website here