CRAIG ALAN

PEOPLE AS PIXELS PRODUCE PORTRAITS OF PEOPLE

Craig Alan / DeMedicis Gallery

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

American artist Craig Alan creates portraits of Marilyn Monroe, John F. Kennedy the Statue of Liberty and even Audrey Hepburn from Breakfast At Tiffany’s and Paris Hilton, like you’ve never seen them before. That’s because he uses people as pixels.

Of course, he’s not the only one who uses humans as visual pins to generate a mosaic. It happens in North Korea all the time (see image of the Mass Games in Pyongyang – a propaganda-filled synchronized performance done by 100,000 people by photographer Sam Gellman). But there is something about Alan’s work that combines the ability to see close up, and the big picture that feels more artistic and substantive.

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

You can find the full article on the Five Thôt website here

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here

Craig Alan

CRAIG ALAN'S FAMOUS FACES IN A CROWD OR HOW INTRICATE ARTWORKS SEE BIG SCREEN STARS RECREATED IN PAINTINGS OF DOZENS OF TINY FIGURES

Craig Alan / De Medicis Gallery

Small people, big star: This portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Atlanta-based artist Craig Alan may look like an aerial photo, but is actually created with dozens of tiny painted figures.

Combining technical skill, creativity and wit, Craig portrays iconic faces, buildings and abstracts through dozens, sometimes hundreds of intricately painted, exquisite figures. Each distinctive piece is created in black and white with a touch of red on some of the more glamorous faces. In their own way, they reflect Craig’s highly recognisable take on life, where it is the small details that work together to create the big picture. 

Craig carefully plans and creates each tiny figure, all which have their own identity and personality which he has thought through to the finest details. In some of his extremely rare originals, he even goes as far as detailing each item of clothing on the individuals. His cast of characters include family members, friends and models, giving his work a uniquely personal touch. Each piece contains a range of 400 to 1,800 people in it depending on the type of work it is, and he spends anywhere from 50 to 150 working hours on one painting.

Now based in Atlanta, Craig was born in California, but his artistic talent began to emerge when his family moved south. His earliest experimentation took the form of street portraiture, an endeavour that helped him perfect his flair for replicating the human figure. He has exhibited his work across the United States and Europe at De Medicis Gallery Paris to great acclaim and is now making a significant impact on the UK market. He has a work of art hanging in the White House in Senator Reed’s office and his art was shown in Scope Miami 2014 “We are all part of something greater than ourselves, and if we work together we could achieve greater balance . . . not in a religious sense but rather a universal sense.”

The full article can be found on the The Daily Mail website here