PREFAB77

Prefab77 used to be a collective working out of Newcastle, and now one artist, Peter Manning represents the title. Number 77 in Prefab77 refers to the year of 1977, which was a very successful year for British celebrities in the arts field. They made a great impact on the British street art scene. Their work included giant paste ups that are almost as big as a three-storey building. Their works are an interesting blend of rock, punk with an ethnic African headgear, and other imagery with women in the center. Manning creates artwork that often has political and sometimes anti-establishment tone, but these images are beautiful and reveal a lot from the modern culture. His work is a dark world of money, fashion, music, and politics woven into a luxurious mixture of acrylic, spray paint, wheat paste, and varnish.

Manning started his career as a printmaker and designer for the Queen in the British Army. He worked as a designer for well-known fashion brands. His work was commissioned by brands like Converse, Gap, Hurley, NIKE, Keds, and Ride Snowboards. In 2011, he created the cover art for Dancing Backward in High Heels, which was the fifth and final studio album by American rock band New York Dolls from the 1970s.

PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS  Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.  70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5       

PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS

Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.

70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5 

 

 

JONTY HURWITZ

“OBLIQUE” AND “CATOPTRIC”: ANAMORPHIC ARTWORKS BY JONTY HURWITZ

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

The painting The Ambassadors (1533) by Bavaria-born artist Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497–1543) occupies a special place in the history of Western art. It features Jean de Dinteville (French Ambassador to the court of Henry VIII of England) and Georges de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur (in southern France). Important elements include an Azerbaijanian rug and mathematical instruments like dials and quadrants. The artwork remains most famous, however, for a strange momento mori in the foreground, at the bottom – a human skull – tilted, contracted, stretched. Visible in its correct form only when seen from an oblique point of view. This is an example of “anamorphosis” – a distorted projection of an object that is set right when regarded from a specific perspective or when reflected on another surface.

 

The Ambassadors (1533) by Hans Holbien, Wikimedia Commons

the skull in The Ambassadors.jpg

The skull in The Ambassadors, Wikipedia

It is believed that the practice goes back to Leonardo da Vinci. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan has a large collection of the Renaissance polymath’s notes. There, on folio 35 of the Codex Atlanticus, are two strangely elongated sketches of a child’s head and an eye. These distorted and hesitant drawings, the first known anamorphoses (c.1485) – along with Holbein’s painting – are the seeds of inspiration for Jonty Hurwitz (born 1969) – a London-based South African artist, engineer and entrepreneur, known for his scientifically inspired works. “Leonardo pushed the boundaries of his time by exploring how the observer’s perception is implicitly linked to the observation,” says Jonty. “My art uses Leonardo’s theories as a starting point.”

A member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, Jonty creates sculptures of both “Oblique Anamorphosis” and “Catoptric Anamorphosis”. The first requires a new angle of vision and the second, a reflecting surface like a steel cylinder. Jonty is also into nano technology and holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s smallest animal form – “Fragile Giant” (2015), a life-like sculpture of an elephant measuring 0.157mm in height.

Jonty HURWITZ     |    The hand that caught me falling     | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

Jonty HURWITZ | The hand that caught me falling | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome