BRUNO CATALANO I DE MEDICIS GALLERY

Sculture per un mondo in transito: I Voyageurs di Bruno Catalano

Li seguo da anni, dalle sponde di Marsiglia, fino all’aeroporto di Singapore, passando per le strade innevate di Courchevel. Sono i Voyageurs, i gruppi scultorei di Bruno Catalano, creature eteree , affascinanti nel misterioso rapporto tra vuoto e pieno, capaci di instaurare un dialogo con il mondo circostante, fino ad identificarsi con esso.

Sono migranti o nomadi, muniti di una valigia alla mano e di una speranza nel cuore alla ricerca di una vita migliore. Uomini per così dire “perforati” e forse ridotti a pezzi, come li ha resi metaforicamente l’ambiente circostante.
Con uno sguardo introspettivo procedono con passo incerto verso una realtà sconosciuta.

JUAN MIGUEL PALACIOS

Juan Miguel Palacios' journey started at the School of Decorative Arts of Madrid which gained him the opportunity to join the studio of renowned Spanish artist Amadeo Roca Gisbert for six years. These years were cruicial for Palacios' artistic flair and this training is visible in every artwork he creates.

Concepts such as mourning, restlessness and inequality are vital in Palacios' work as they allow him to explore a range of human emotions. His powerful and modern techniques involve almost abstract brushtrokes and a strong use of colour to create a feeling of decay and abandonment.

Driven by his search for new forms of expression, Juan Miguel Palacios created series such as Wounded, where the artist has used broken walls as the surface for his works. This technique has created an extra dimension in his work which he allows the viewer to dissect. His works blend reality with dreamlike worlds, with his subjects seeming to escape their two-dimensional invisible cages and become tangible parts of reality.

Canvas, vinyl, meth-acrylate, aluminium and drywall surfaces are where Juan Miguel Palacios presents his work.

Title : Wounds LXXI  106 x 122 x 10 cm  Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

Title : Wounds LXXI
106 x 122 x 10 cm
Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

JONTY HURWITZ

“OBLIQUE” AND “CATOPTRIC”: ANAMORPHIC ARTWORKS BY JONTY HURWITZ

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

The painting The Ambassadors (1533) by Bavaria-born artist Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497–1543) occupies a special place in the history of Western art. It features Jean de Dinteville (French Ambassador to the court of Henry VIII of England) and Georges de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur (in southern France). Important elements include an Azerbaijanian rug and mathematical instruments like dials and quadrants. The artwork remains most famous, however, for a strange momento mori in the foreground, at the bottom – a human skull – tilted, contracted, stretched. Visible in its correct form only when seen from an oblique point of view. This is an example of “anamorphosis” – a distorted projection of an object that is set right when regarded from a specific perspective or when reflected on another surface.

 

The Ambassadors (1533) by Hans Holbien, Wikimedia Commons

the skull in The Ambassadors.jpg

The skull in The Ambassadors, Wikipedia

It is believed that the practice goes back to Leonardo da Vinci. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan has a large collection of the Renaissance polymath’s notes. There, on folio 35 of the Codex Atlanticus, are two strangely elongated sketches of a child’s head and an eye. These distorted and hesitant drawings, the first known anamorphoses (c.1485) – along with Holbein’s painting – are the seeds of inspiration for Jonty Hurwitz (born 1969) – a London-based South African artist, engineer and entrepreneur, known for his scientifically inspired works. “Leonardo pushed the boundaries of his time by exploring how the observer’s perception is implicitly linked to the observation,” says Jonty. “My art uses Leonardo’s theories as a starting point.”

A member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, Jonty creates sculptures of both “Oblique Anamorphosis” and “Catoptric Anamorphosis”. The first requires a new angle of vision and the second, a reflecting surface like a steel cylinder. Jonty is also into nano technology and holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s smallest animal form – “Fragile Giant” (2015), a life-like sculpture of an elephant measuring 0.157mm in height.

Jonty HURWITZ     |    The hand that caught me falling     | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

Jonty HURWITZ | The hand that caught me falling | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

David Gerstein

POP ART FOR THE PEOPLE: DAVID GERSTEIN’S HAPPY PALETTE

David Gerstein / De Medicis Gallery

Museums and galleries tend to abide by the “no touch” rule to safeguard the artworks they display. But Israeli contemporary artist David Gerstein encourages a hands-on approach, firmly believing that his creations are for the public and not for private collectors or curators.

“My philosophy is that art should touch life. It shouldn’t be something that you see once a year when you go to a museum,” Gerstein tells ISRAEL21c at his studio in the Bet Shemesh Industrial Zone.

There’s a pop-art feel to the everyday items he depicts in his multilayered wall sculptures, outdoor sculptures, paintings, prints, drawings and designed objects.

David Gerstein’s “Fifth Avenue” wall sculpture

“It’s my personal pop art. I’m not following Andy Warhol but I’m using the same feeling about the colors, about the popular images,” he explains. “It’s about speaking with the audience at eye level. My work is not a riddle. Many times I go to museums and see artworks that are vague. I want people to understand what I mean.”

The subject matter for his paintings and sculptures all comes from scenes in his past. “My memory of my mother riding a bike became the Tour de France wall sculpture,” he explains. “I’m not just inventing images. They’re all based on my memories.”

Gerstein has succeeded in bringing his universal language of playfulness, humor and optimism to the public-at-large in many countries.

“Peloton Wave,” done in 2014, is installed outside an athletic stadium inSinchu, South Korea. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

His most famous work, an 18.35-meter-high painted steel outdoor sculpture called “Momentum,” is installed in Singapore’s central business district. “It became an icon,” he says.

“Momentum” in Singapore. Photo courtesy of David Gerstein

“My best works are outdoors because it’s in the public domain. I like people to experience it when they’re walking, driving, being part of the public. That gives me the most pleasure,” he says. “It talks with the environment, with the surrounding architecture. It’s my great experience, doing public works.”

Which of his works is his favorite? “My most favorite is the one I’m going to do,” Gerstein replies.“My mind is always thinking about the next creation.”

You can find the full article on the ISRAEL21c's website here

CRAIG ALAN

PEOPLE AS PIXELS PRODUCE PORTRAITS OF PEOPLE

Craig Alan / DeMedicis Gallery

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

Audrey Hepburn by Craig Alan

American artist Craig Alan creates portraits of Marilyn Monroe, John F. Kennedy the Statue of Liberty and even Audrey Hepburn from Breakfast At Tiffany’s and Paris Hilton, like you’ve never seen them before. That’s because he uses people as pixels.

Of course, he’s not the only one who uses humans as visual pins to generate a mosaic. It happens in North Korea all the time (see image of the Mass Games in Pyongyang – a propaganda-filled synchronized performance done by 100,000 people by photographer Sam Gellman). But there is something about Alan’s work that combines the ability to see close up, and the big picture that feels more artistic and substantive.

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

Photograph by Sam Gellman from the Mass Games in North Korea

You can find the full article on the Five Thôt website here

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here

Bruno Catalano

LES SCULPTURES INCOMPLÈTES DE BRUNO CATALANO

Bruno Catalano / De Medicis Gallery

Bruno Catalano est un artiste français qui réalise des sculptures d’un genre particulier. Dans sa série des voyageurs, il explore le déracinement, en amputant une certaine partie du corps aux figures qu’il réalise.

Son oeuvre donne tout son sens quand elle est exposée dans un environnement urbain, comme ici à Marseille :

Posées en hauteur, les sculptures ne laissent plus que leur faille béante à contempler, symbole de la partie que laisse derrière lui le voyageur, quittant son pays, sa ville.

Et si vous skiez du côté de Courchevel, vous pourrez également admirer quelques unes de ses œuvres dans la station, près de l'office de tourisme et du forum.

Vous pouvez retrouver cet article dans son intégralité sur le site de TuxBoard ici