JONTY HURWITZ

“OBLIQUE” AND “CATOPTRIC”: ANAMORPHIC ARTWORKS BY JONTY HURWITZ

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

The painting The Ambassadors (1533) by Bavaria-born artist Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497–1543) occupies a special place in the history of Western art. It features Jean de Dinteville (French Ambassador to the court of Henry VIII of England) and Georges de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur (in southern France). Important elements include an Azerbaijanian rug and mathematical instruments like dials and quadrants. The artwork remains most famous, however, for a strange momento mori in the foreground, at the bottom – a human skull – tilted, contracted, stretched. Visible in its correct form only when seen from an oblique point of view. This is an example of “anamorphosis” – a distorted projection of an object that is set right when regarded from a specific perspective or when reflected on another surface.

 

The Ambassadors (1533) by Hans Holbien, Wikimedia Commons

the skull in The Ambassadors.jpg

The skull in The Ambassadors, Wikipedia

It is believed that the practice goes back to Leonardo da Vinci. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan has a large collection of the Renaissance polymath’s notes. There, on folio 35 of the Codex Atlanticus, are two strangely elongated sketches of a child’s head and an eye. These distorted and hesitant drawings, the first known anamorphoses (c.1485) – along with Holbein’s painting – are the seeds of inspiration for Jonty Hurwitz (born 1969) – a London-based South African artist, engineer and entrepreneur, known for his scientifically inspired works. “Leonardo pushed the boundaries of his time by exploring how the observer’s perception is implicitly linked to the observation,” says Jonty. “My art uses Leonardo’s theories as a starting point.”

A member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, Jonty creates sculptures of both “Oblique Anamorphosis” and “Catoptric Anamorphosis”. The first requires a new angle of vision and the second, a reflecting surface like a steel cylinder. Jonty is also into nano technology and holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s smallest animal form – “Fragile Giant” (2015), a life-like sculpture of an elephant measuring 0.157mm in height.

Jonty HURWITZ     |    The hand that caught me falling     | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

Jonty HURWITZ | The hand that caught me falling | 50 x 50 x 50 cm | Bronze, wood & chrome

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here

JONTY HURWITZ

JONTY HURWITZ CREATES WORLD'S SMALLEST SCULPTURE ONLY FOR IT TO BE ACCIDENTALLY CRUSHED AS IT WAS BEING PHOTOGRAPHED

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

An artist has created the world's smallest sculpture only for it to be accidentally crushed by a finger while being photographed. 

Jonty Hurwitz's creations are so tiny they can rest on a human hair and are the same size of an ant's head. Having spent months working on the pieces, the 45-year-old from Chichester, West Sussex, took them to a photographer to have them pictured under a microscope. But within minutes his work had been destroyed by the stroke of the lab technician's finger. 

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

I went off to have the original sculptures photographed so I found a laboratory with an electron microscope and the photographic technology,' said Mr Hurwitz. 

'The technician went to change the orientation and then for the next half an hour we were looking for the piece through the lens. Eventually I noticed there was a fingerprint exactly where the sculpture used to be and I was like "man you have just destroyed the smallest art pieces" ever made - I slightly freaked out.' 

The sculptures are less than 1mm tall and are produced via a process called nano-painting. They are too small to be seen with the naked eye so must be viewed and photographed under a microscope. Mr Hurwitz uses a 3D printing technology to produce them. 

Describing the process on his website, he said: 'The structure is created using a ground-breaking new 3D printing technology and a technique called Multiphoton Lithography. 

The sculptures are believed to be the smallest representation of the human form ever created by man.  

Mr Hurwitz has produced a number of nano sculptures using the same technology though the naked woman above is believed to have been the smallest.

'Ultimately these works are created using the physical phenomenon of two photon absorption. Art, literally created with Quantum Physics. This two photon absorption occurs only at the tiny focal point - basically a tiny 3D pixel (called a Voxel). 

'The sculpture is then moved along fractionally by a computer controlled process and the next pixel is created. Slowly, over hours and hours the entire sculpture is assembled pixel by pixel and layer by layer.'

You can find the full article of the Daily Mail here