Juan Miguel Palacios : Entre rêves et réalité

A l’âge de 6 ans, Juan Miguel est un garçon très hyperactif. Sa mère ne trouve pas de moyen de le canaliser, et décide de l’inscrire dans un cours de peinture en lui faisant croire qu’il s’agit d’un cours de karaté. Bien que déçu par le mensonge de sa mère, Juan Miguel Palacios est impressionné par les toiles, chevalets et accessoires de peinture présents dans la salle d’art et c’est à partir de ce moment-là qu’il trouve sa vocation.

Juan Miguel Palacios a effectué ensuite ses études à l’école d’arts décoratifs de Madrid « Amadeo Roca Gisbert » où il a travaillé pendant six ans. Cette période va fortement inspirer Juan Miguel Palacios dans chacune de ses créations.

Pour l’artiste, les murs cassés sont utilisés comme surface, sur laquelle la peinture vient fusionner afin de donner des œuvres d’une puissance inouïe. Juan Miguel Palacios aborde les concepts de deuil, d’agitation et d’inégalité, ce qui lui permet d’explorer en profondeur les émotions propres à l’être humain.

De Medicis Gallery a l’honneur d’exposer ses œuvres d’art au 18 Place des Vosges 

JMPalacios-wounds.-CXXI.jpg
Juan Miguel Palacios.jpg

JOSHUA JENSEN-NAGLE : LE PHOTOGRAPHE DES PLUS BELLES PLAGES DU MONDE

JOSHUA JENSEN NAGLE a commencé à photographier les plages dans les années 2000 car il en garde des souvenirs joyeux et juvéniles, des souvenirs de pur bonheur. Selon lui, les gens vont sur les plages pour échapper à la foule et se laisser aller. Pour lui, chaque plage est différente : la couleur de l'eau ou la forme des vagues.

La première étape de son travail consiste à effectuer des recherches sur Internet. Il se sert notamment de Google Earth pour savoir à quelle période de l’année les plages sont bondées ou désertes

Une fois qu'il a trouvé le parfait emplacement, la deuxième étape consiste à utiliser un réseau de fixers (Généralement utilisé par des personnes travaillant dans l'industrie cinématographique et qui ont des contacts dans le monde entier) pour savoir quelles sont les autorisations locales nécessaires pour filmer/photographier ces endroits. Généralement, ces autorisations sont limitées à des endroits précis et pose des limites d’altitudes autorisée.

Pour mener à bien son travail, Joshua s’accompagne d’un pilote professionnel car effectuent souvent des manœuvres délicates pour trouver le meilleur angle pour la photo.  

Da manière anecdotique, Joshua raconte qu’il déteste voler et l’avion car il trouve cela très angoissant surtout quand il y a des turbulences. Mais il arrive à se calmer ne regardant par la fenêtre et la vue lui permet de se détendre.  Il raconte également que la météo est un facteur important dans son travail. En effet il y a beaucoup de facteurs environnementaux à prendre en compte comme le vent par exemple.

 

Joshua jensen Nagle De medicis .jpg
Joshua Jensen nagle .jpg

BRUNO CATALANO I DE MEDICIS GALLERY

Sculture per un mondo in transito: I Voyageurs di Bruno Catalano

Li seguo da anni, dalle sponde di Marsiglia, fino all’aeroporto di Singapore, passando per le strade innevate di Courchevel. Sono i Voyageurs, i gruppi scultorei di Bruno Catalano, creature eteree , affascinanti nel misterioso rapporto tra vuoto e pieno, capaci di instaurare un dialogo con il mondo circostante, fino ad identificarsi con esso.

Sono migranti o nomadi, muniti di una valigia alla mano e di una speranza nel cuore alla ricerca di una vita migliore. Uomini per così dire “perforati” e forse ridotti a pezzi, come li ha resi metaforicamente l’ambiente circostante.
Con uno sguardo introspettivo procedono con passo incerto verso una realtà sconosciuta.

DAVID GERSTEIN

ISRAELI ARTIST DISPLAYS CUT-OUT SCULPTURES

David Gerstein / DeMedicis Gallery

Art by Israeli artist David Gerstein 

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Israeli artist David Gerstein, 73, loves observing small animals, especially butterflies whose beautiful colors and dancing amaze him. He also likes watching crowds of people that make him feel the energies of city life. Although he is not good at sports, he is fascinated with the grace which athletes demonstrate.

He transforms his affection for these things into cut-out sculptures, with series called Butterfly, Sports, Beach and Urban.

The series are now on show at Beijing's Today Art Museum, as part of his China debut exhibition titled Layers, through May 16. His paintings are also on display.

Early in his career, Gerstein was into painting, but gradually focused on sculpture in the 1980s, which he sees as adding a third dimension to his paintings.

For his cut-out sculptures, he cuts out shapes from metal plates, paints on them and layers them.

Describing his show, he says, "The exhibition (in Beijing) is (for me) the most important one in a decade. But it is not a retrospective. That time hasn't yet arrived."

You can find the full article here 

SNIK INTERVIEW

SNIK INTERVIEW BY STREET ART UNITED STATES 

by Sami Wakim

Initially inspired by the Graffiti scene, Snik has been working with stencil and spray can for 10 years now. Constantly pushing the boundaries, this artist duo has developed a unique style which is equally captivating on walls as it in on canvas. Staying true to their form, Snik hand cuts up to nine layers at a time, working with different mediums, techniques, paints and varnishes. Regardless of size, the level of detail is insane, and use of colours and forms, inspirational. Showing in Galleries, shows and forums across the globe, they had their inaugural solo show in 2011, and now has a serious following of admirers and collectors worldwide.

Let me first say that I am fascinated about the way you create your art. Although, I don’t really know anything about you, could you explain who you are, where you´re from and how did you get started in the street art scene?
Snik was originally started by myself (nik), back in 2005. I had always been a keen artist, but never really viewed it as something that could get me from place to place doing what I loved. Over the years people have shown an interest, and invited me to places all over the world to paint, which has been incredible. As the years have gone on, I have always tried to go bigger and better with each piece, I feel, constant progression and improvement are the things that help to keep me on my toes. About 4 years ago I met my other half, and we began to paint bigger walls together. Having 2 people on board meant we can cut bigger stencils quicker, and paint larger walls that one person with a stencil couldn’t, so it’s been a huge help to become a duo. Some people don’t know that, we have never really pushed, as I don’t think it matters so much. When you view art you never question how many people, just the nature of it and how it makes you feel.

Do you have a formal education?
We have both been to college, but neither studied Art. It was never helpful for either of us in the direction we were heading.

Your art is multilayered and complex. Could you describe the development process of your artwork?
I think stencil work is a form of OCD. To sit for hours on end, cutting small pieces of card from bigger pieces of card, it’s not a standard method of art, but a more precise and exact craft. The way we try to balance this, is by painting very quickly, and very rough and ready. Every canvas we paint is painted the same way it would be done on the street, drips, smudges, mess and mistakes are all a part of it. The tightness of the stencil is only a balance to the freedom of the painting.

How much does your art affect or influence your everyday life and are there any role models or artists who inspired you?
Everything we do is art related. There isn’t a day that goes by that you don’t read up on a recent paint event, or check out a recent gallery show. That being said, we are very separate in the fact that we live in the countryside, and not a city. We don’t get caught up in a scene as such, but obviously are inspired by just how much incredible art is being produced all around the world right now.

How do you go about creating your street art? How do you choose a street/environment?
Normally we will cut the stencil, then source a spot. It can be a quick thing, or can take a while. Stencils can be restricting in your size and surface you have to work with, but this can also be the challenge to it. Spray paint works on anything, so it’s all down to how you use a stencil, and how you approach the aesthetic of the area.

Has your style developed throughout the years?
I would say so yes. The stencil cutting is a lot more free, and as each new piece is produced, there are new lessons learnt. The use of lighting has always been a big influence in the work, shadows especially effect the final outcome. As mentioned before, the use of the stencil can be restricting, so it’s important for us to work around this, and make the final piece more relaxed and natural, as stencils can sometimes be very stiff and harsh in final appearance.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet and social media in making your work more accessible to the public?
The internet has revolutionized the way people view artwork now, in every sense. Some street pieces only last a day, but once it’s online, it is pretty much there forever. The same goes for any little post we may put about a new stencil, or a test spray. For those who don’t have gallery connections, or good hook ups for walls, it’s a great way to get yourself out there and get noticed. We always enjoy painting street as much as possible, but it’s just not always possible for us to get every single new piece onto a wall straight away, so we get into the studio and produce a work to showcase the new cuts this way instead. But in the back of our minds we always want every piece to eventually make it to a wall.

Which countries have you visited to paint so far and where did you like it best?
We have visited France, Holland, Switzerland, Germany, and Spain. Each one is incredible in its on way, it would be impossible to select a favourite, as every paint trip has so many great memories. The meeting of new people is definitely one of the best points about what we do, and it’s what we enjoy the most.

Is there a message in your art?
maybe there is, maybe there isn’t.

Street art is still considered vandalism, how is it for you to go out and paint in the street? Did you ever have any problems with the law?
When I started in 2005, I used to enjoy going out and doing paste ups, little 1 or 2 layer stencils. It was a fun rush, but of course it created friction with authority, and was never going to end well. As we grew older and developed, the illegal thing lost an interest, mainly because our stencils evolved into such technical works that to rush them in 30 minutes would be a really poor looking final piece, and not the sort of thing we want to produce. It’s really rare that we do a full illegal piece, and even if we do we don’t advertise it, for obvious reasons.

 

What have been your most challenging and rewarding piece of work thus far?
The most challenging piece was the Winged-Fire (pictured above) piece we painted in our home town last year. It was only an 8 layer stencil at around 7 foot tall, but each layer was 5 different colours. So to get the cuts natural, and the blends working took a very long time, and a lot of stress. It helped to push us a lot to progress in the direction we have, so It is definitely one that sticks in our mind.

What do you do when you are not creating art? What are your hobbies?
Dog walking. Wine drinking.

What’s next for you? What shows or projects do you have planned?
We have a big year planned, but you’ll have to keep an eye on our social media for info.

Any words of advice for aspiring new artists?
Don’t stop. Always wear a spray mask.

 

JONTY HURWITZ

PERSPECTIVES ON FORMS SHAPING MIRRORED SCULPTURES

Jonty Hurwitz / De Medicis Gallery

Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life.” These words belong to London-based sculptor Jonty Hurwitz, who used 3D scanning and the power of π to create stunning anamorphic sculptures that can be seen in cylindrical reflections.Complexity, study and trying stood at the base of these incredible modern sculptures, while perspective and curiosity shaped something out of the ordinary.

Metallic cylinders mirror stretched sculptures whose shapes are only seen from a certain perspective. What seems to be melted copper is showcased in the metal cylinder as a grasping hand in the work called “Rejuvenation”, while another piece reveals a frog in the mirror. Some pieces display pieces that become whole when looked at from a specific vantage point, expressing the need to be in the right place. If you’d like to see one of the pieces, the artist has one on display in the De Medicis Gallery, Place des Vosges.

The full article can be found on the site of The Pursuitist here