STIKKI PEACHES

Stikki Peaches’ is an anonymous street artist who is strongly influenced by pop culture references and street culture. From his beginnings in 2009, his “What If Art Ruled The World?” tagline had every passer-by engaged in thought, while enjoying the uniqueness of his nostalgia-laced street art.

Having had his first international solo show in 2013 in New York and having participated in the Scope Art Show NYC, Art Basel Miami and Urvanity Art Fair in Madrid, Spain, Stikki Peaches now looks forward to his first Euro exhibitions in late 2017 and 2018. His work as also been seen in the urban areas of Paris, New York, Toronto, Los Angeles, Berlin, Stockholm and London.


  Frida Kahlo de Rivera , 122 × 122 cm, 2018

Frida Kahlo de Rivera, 122 × 122 cm, 2018

MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ


MARIE ANGE DAUDÉ I DE MEDICIS GALLERY I GALERIE DE MEDICIS

Between chaos and rebirth, her works are a reflection of our environment, and perhaps even a reflection of us as well.
Born in 1964, this visual artist represents through her heckled portraits, broken and glued back together, fragile, reconstituted from nothing, the passing of time and make us deal with emotions that bring two beings

together.
Through the series « the timeless »made with feathers, staples, and pins, Marie Ange tries to revive old photos by applying contemporar y technology and by magnifying what is at first a simple material.
With the feather portraits held by thin threads, the artist explores the fragility and the melancholy of the moment. The feelings and the characters that emerge are thus like the feathers that makes them up: suspended, frozen in a fall or a whirlwind, both eternal and motionless. Femininity is exacerbated by the lightness and the fragility of the medium.

ISABELLE SCHELTENS

DISTANCE CREATES BEAUTY 

ISABEL SCHLETJENS DE MEDICIS GALLERY .png

Isabelle Scheltjens has put an original and contemporary touch on classical pointillism. She developed a new way of portrait making, whereby thousands of pieces of glass in specific patterns optically form an image. Pointillists used small, distinct dots of pure colour on their canvases, placed in close proximity so that they would blur into new colours. Isabelle applies a similar technique, using layers of coloured glass instead of paint. She immersed herself in the understanding of colour and creates her portraits with maniacal intensity – featuring intricate detail, lighting and shadows.

PREFAB77

Prefab77 used to be a collective working out of Newcastle, and now one artist, Peter Manning represents the title. Number 77 in Prefab77 refers to the year of 1977, which was a very successful year for British celebrities in the arts field. They made a great impact on the British street art scene. Their work included giant paste ups that are almost as big as a three-storey building. Their works are an interesting blend of rock, punk with an ethnic African headgear, and other imagery with women in the center. Manning creates artwork that often has political and sometimes anti-establishment tone, but these images are beautiful and reveal a lot from the modern culture. His work is a dark world of money, fashion, music, and politics woven into a luxurious mixture of acrylic, spray paint, wheat paste, and varnish.

Manning started his career as a printmaker and designer for the Queen in the British Army. He worked as a designer for well-known fashion brands. His work was commissioned by brands like Converse, Gap, Hurley, NIKE, Keds, and Ride Snowboards. In 2011, he created the cover art for Dancing Backward in High Heels, which was the fifth and final studio album by American rock band New York Dolls from the 1970s.

 PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS  Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.  70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5       

PREFAB 77 | BELIEVE IN ANGELS

Mixed media - luxurious mix of hand paint, print and stencil - acrylic, gold ink, five layer stencil, spraypaint and gold paint on Acrylic Primed Cotton Duck artist quality canvas.

70 x 100 cm | 27 3/5 in x 39 2/5 

 

 

KURAR

Kurar, tombe dans le graffiti dès la fin des années 90. Pendant 10 ans il va peindre, travaillant sur la 3D, le volume, et la couleur.. Au fil du temps et des expériences il va diversifier ses techniques, Graff, Vandale, Pochoir, Collage, pour ce concentrer sur le travail des pochoirs.

Au travers du pochoir et de son travail sur toiles, ce street artist traite des sujets actuels et nous pousse à prendre du recul sur notre vision de la société. Mélangeant univers ancien, et détails contemporain dans ces œuvres Kurar traite avec poésie, humour et provocation, des sujets sensibles comme la guerre, la religion, et la société de consommation.

L’utilisation et la représentation de l’enfance, est un des points récurent et une certaine « marque de fabrique » de Kurar. Il utilise brillamment ce symbole de l’innocence pour contraster avec l’aspect satirique et provocatrice de ces représentations.

Depuis une ascension en 2013, marqué par une exposition personnelle à la galerie Parisienne Onega, le street artist enchaine les expositions personnel et expose dans les galeries du monde entier, New york, Los Angeles, Genève, Dusseldorf, La Reunion, Bruxelles, Berlin, etc..

Entre cynisme et péosie, nostalgie et humour noir, il touche le public par la profondeur et la pertinence de ses messages.

 Socilal Distortion I Acrylique on canvas I 130 x 89 cm 

Socilal Distortion I Acrylique on canvas I 130 x 89 cm 

JUAN MIGUEL PALACIOS

Juan Miguel Palacios' journey started at the School of Decorative Arts of Madrid which gained him the opportunity to join the studio of renowned Spanish artist Amadeo Roca Gisbert for six years. These years were cruicial for Palacios' artistic flair and this training is visible in every artwork he creates.

Concepts such as mourning, restlessness and inequality are vital in Palacios' work as they allow him to explore a range of human emotions. His powerful and modern techniques involve almost abstract brushtrokes and a strong use of colour to create a feeling of decay and abandonment.

Driven by his search for new forms of expression, Juan Miguel Palacios created series such as Wounded, where the artist has used broken walls as the surface for his works. This technique has created an extra dimension in his work which he allows the viewer to dissect. His works blend reality with dreamlike worlds, with his subjects seeming to escape their two-dimensional invisible cages and become tangible parts of reality.

Canvas, vinyl, meth-acrylate, aluminium and drywall surfaces are where Juan Miguel Palacios presents his work.

 Title : Wounds LXXI  106 x 122 x 10 cm  Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

Title : Wounds LXXI
106 x 122 x 10 cm
Mixed media on clear vinyl and drywall

DAVID GERSTEIN

ISRAELI ARTIST DISPLAYS CUT-OUT SCULPTURES

David Gerstein / DeMedicis Gallery

Art by Israeli artist David Gerstein 

 Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

Art by Italian artist David Gerstein [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Israeli artist David Gerstein, 73, loves observing small animals, especially butterflies whose beautiful colors and dancing amaze him. He also likes watching crowds of people that make him feel the energies of city life. Although he is not good at sports, he is fascinated with the grace which athletes demonstrate.

He transforms his affection for these things into cut-out sculptures, with series called Butterfly, Sports, Beach and Urban.

The series are now on show at Beijing's Today Art Museum, as part of his China debut exhibition titled Layers, through May 16. His paintings are also on display.

Early in his career, Gerstein was into painting, but gradually focused on sculpture in the 1980s, which he sees as adding a third dimension to his paintings.

For his cut-out sculptures, he cuts out shapes from metal plates, paints on them and layers them.

Describing his show, he says, "The exhibition (in Beijing) is (for me) the most important one in a decade. But it is not a retrospective. That time hasn't yet arrived."

You can find the full article here 

SNIK INTERVIEW

SNIK INTERVIEW BY STREET ART UNITED STATES 

by Sami Wakim

Initially inspired by the Graffiti scene, Snik has been working with stencil and spray can for 10 years now. Constantly pushing the boundaries, this artist duo has developed a unique style which is equally captivating on walls as it in on canvas. Staying true to their form, Snik hand cuts up to nine layers at a time, working with different mediums, techniques, paints and varnishes. Regardless of size, the level of detail is insane, and use of colours and forms, inspirational. Showing in Galleries, shows and forums across the globe, they had their inaugural solo show in 2011, and now has a serious following of admirers and collectors worldwide.

Let me first say that I am fascinated about the way you create your art. Although, I don’t really know anything about you, could you explain who you are, where you´re from and how did you get started in the street art scene?
Snik was originally started by myself (nik), back in 2005. I had always been a keen artist, but never really viewed it as something that could get me from place to place doing what I loved. Over the years people have shown an interest, and invited me to places all over the world to paint, which has been incredible. As the years have gone on, I have always tried to go bigger and better with each piece, I feel, constant progression and improvement are the things that help to keep me on my toes. About 4 years ago I met my other half, and we began to paint bigger walls together. Having 2 people on board meant we can cut bigger stencils quicker, and paint larger walls that one person with a stencil couldn’t, so it’s been a huge help to become a duo. Some people don’t know that, we have never really pushed, as I don’t think it matters so much. When you view art you never question how many people, just the nature of it and how it makes you feel.

Do you have a formal education?
We have both been to college, but neither studied Art. It was never helpful for either of us in the direction we were heading.

Your art is multilayered and complex. Could you describe the development process of your artwork?
I think stencil work is a form of OCD. To sit for hours on end, cutting small pieces of card from bigger pieces of card, it’s not a standard method of art, but a more precise and exact craft. The way we try to balance this, is by painting very quickly, and very rough and ready. Every canvas we paint is painted the same way it would be done on the street, drips, smudges, mess and mistakes are all a part of it. The tightness of the stencil is only a balance to the freedom of the painting.

How much does your art affect or influence your everyday life and are there any role models or artists who inspired you?
Everything we do is art related. There isn’t a day that goes by that you don’t read up on a recent paint event, or check out a recent gallery show. That being said, we are very separate in the fact that we live in the countryside, and not a city. We don’t get caught up in a scene as such, but obviously are inspired by just how much incredible art is being produced all around the world right now.

How do you go about creating your street art? How do you choose a street/environment?
Normally we will cut the stencil, then source a spot. It can be a quick thing, or can take a while. Stencils can be restricting in your size and surface you have to work with, but this can also be the challenge to it. Spray paint works on anything, so it’s all down to how you use a stencil, and how you approach the aesthetic of the area.

Has your style developed throughout the years?
I would say so yes. The stencil cutting is a lot more free, and as each new piece is produced, there are new lessons learnt. The use of lighting has always been a big influence in the work, shadows especially effect the final outcome. As mentioned before, the use of the stencil can be restricting, so it’s important for us to work around this, and make the final piece more relaxed and natural, as stencils can sometimes be very stiff and harsh in final appearance.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet and social media in making your work more accessible to the public?
The internet has revolutionized the way people view artwork now, in every sense. Some street pieces only last a day, but once it’s online, it is pretty much there forever. The same goes for any little post we may put about a new stencil, or a test spray. For those who don’t have gallery connections, or good hook ups for walls, it’s a great way to get yourself out there and get noticed. We always enjoy painting street as much as possible, but it’s just not always possible for us to get every single new piece onto a wall straight away, so we get into the studio and produce a work to showcase the new cuts this way instead. But in the back of our minds we always want every piece to eventually make it to a wall.

Which countries have you visited to paint so far and where did you like it best?
We have visited France, Holland, Switzerland, Germany, and Spain. Each one is incredible in its on way, it would be impossible to select a favourite, as every paint trip has so many great memories. The meeting of new people is definitely one of the best points about what we do, and it’s what we enjoy the most.

Is there a message in your art?
maybe there is, maybe there isn’t.

Street art is still considered vandalism, how is it for you to go out and paint in the street? Did you ever have any problems with the law?
When I started in 2005, I used to enjoy going out and doing paste ups, little 1 or 2 layer stencils. It was a fun rush, but of course it created friction with authority, and was never going to end well. As we grew older and developed, the illegal thing lost an interest, mainly because our stencils evolved into such technical works that to rush them in 30 minutes would be a really poor looking final piece, and not the sort of thing we want to produce. It’s really rare that we do a full illegal piece, and even if we do we don’t advertise it, for obvious reasons.

 

What have been your most challenging and rewarding piece of work thus far?
The most challenging piece was the Winged-Fire (pictured above) piece we painted in our home town last year. It was only an 8 layer stencil at around 7 foot tall, but each layer was 5 different colours. So to get the cuts natural, and the blends working took a very long time, and a lot of stress. It helped to push us a lot to progress in the direction we have, so It is definitely one that sticks in our mind.

What do you do when you are not creating art? What are your hobbies?
Dog walking. Wine drinking.

What’s next for you? What shows or projects do you have planned?
We have a big year planned, but you’ll have to keep an eye on our social media for info.

Any words of advice for aspiring new artists?
Don’t stop. Always wear a spray mask.

 

Nerone

LE MUR DE BORDEAUX BY NERONE   

Nerone / De Medicis Gallery

1ère semaine de froid hivernal en ce début d’année 2016, et pourtant le printemps est déjà de retour sur le mur de Bordeaux avec Nerone.

Depuis le 15 Janvier, les fleurs ont envahi la place Jean & Jean Paul Avisseau.
Sur un fond tracé un peu comme un négatif de photo, Nerone a peint chaque pétale avec des couleurs vives pour finir sur un éclatant bouquet de fleurs exotiques.
Juste à côté des 2 flamboyants loups de Spaik, le lieu rayonne littéralement et semble donner du peps à l’ensemble du quartier.

Originaire de la région bordelaise et membre du collectif CoktailNerone a notamment réalisé avec son acolyte Epis un magnifique mur en partenariat avec la mairie de Bégles, dans la banlieue bordelaise, sur la façade du batiment abritant le service Jeune de la ville.
Surnommé Dandy Birds, l’oeuvre représente 2 pies au look baroque, guidées par ce qui semble être une diane chasseresse et un dandy anglais.
Impossible de passer à côté si l’on se balade dans ce quartier..

Egalement présent à la derniere saison de Transfert avec son collectif, Coktail avait choisi le thème de la fête foraine pour investir une partie de l’ancien commissariat Casteja avec une mise en scène ultra vitaminée.

Retouvez l'article ici

Nerone

STREET ART BY FRENCH ARTIST NERONE

Nerone / De Medicis Gallery

Nerone was inspired by Hip Hop and graffiti culture from age eleven. He spent years fine turning his writing skills before diving into street art. A journey which has taken him around Europe including Shoreditch in East London. The rich colour palette breathes life into any surface Nerone chooses to paint. 

Source : http://londonstreetartdesign.co.uk/street-art-by-french-artist-nerone/

Craig Alan

CRAIG ALAN'S FAMOUS FACES IN A CROWD OR HOW INTRICATE ARTWORKS SEE BIG SCREEN STARS RECREATED IN PAINTINGS OF DOZENS OF TINY FIGURES

Craig Alan / De Medicis Gallery

Small people, big star: This portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Atlanta-based artist Craig Alan may look like an aerial photo, but is actually created with dozens of tiny painted figures.

Combining technical skill, creativity and wit, Craig portrays iconic faces, buildings and abstracts through dozens, sometimes hundreds of intricately painted, exquisite figures. Each distinctive piece is created in black and white with a touch of red on some of the more glamorous faces. In their own way, they reflect Craig’s highly recognisable take on life, where it is the small details that work together to create the big picture. 

Craig carefully plans and creates each tiny figure, all which have their own identity and personality which he has thought through to the finest details. In some of his extremely rare originals, he even goes as far as detailing each item of clothing on the individuals. His cast of characters include family members, friends and models, giving his work a uniquely personal touch. Each piece contains a range of 400 to 1,800 people in it depending on the type of work it is, and he spends anywhere from 50 to 150 working hours on one painting.

Now based in Atlanta, Craig was born in California, but his artistic talent began to emerge when his family moved south. His earliest experimentation took the form of street portraiture, an endeavour that helped him perfect his flair for replicating the human figure. He has exhibited his work across the United States and Europe at De Medicis Gallery Paris to great acclaim and is now making a significant impact on the UK market. He has a work of art hanging in the White House in Senator Reed’s office and his art was shown in Scope Miami 2014 “We are all part of something greater than ourselves, and if we work together we could achieve greater balance . . . not in a religious sense but rather a universal sense.”

The full article can be found on the The Daily Mail website here